Mark 11. Forum Discussion

The triumphal entry of Jesus

Chapter 11 begins with Jesus making what is referred to as His, “Triumphal Entry.” Have you ever wondered why it is called, “Triumphant” when such a brutal killing of our Savior was about to take place? It is because Jesus saw God’s plan all the way through, despite enormous personal suffering and excruciating pain.

Just before they entered Jerusalem, Mark records how Jesus was telling His disciples about what was going to happen to Him. “They were on the road going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking on ahead of them; and they were amazed, and those who followed were fearful. And again He took the twelve aside and began to tell them what was going to happen to Him, saying, “Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be delivered to the chief priests and the scribes; and they will condemn Him to death and will hand Him over to the Gentiles.  They will mock Him and spit on Him, and scourge Him and kill Him, and three days later He will rise again.” – Mark 10:32-34. We can assume that Jesus was under tremendous stress as He led His disciples into Jerusalem knowing full well what lied ahead of Him.

As He is riding into Jerusalem, people were spreading their coats before Him, and others spread leafy branches which they had cut from the fields. This was done out of reverence for Jesus. For today’s study, think about how this must have looked and felt to Jesus. He is riding on the back of a donkey which He knew fulfilled the scriptures that prophesied about this day. The painful crucifixion that awaited Him must have been on His mind. Visualize the crowds lining the streets and spreading their coats and branches in front of them. Think about how every branch and every coat that Jesus saw reminded Him of what He came to Jerusalem to do.

When they finally got to Jerusalem, Jesus entered the temple and instead of seeing people praying, He sees people buying and selling. Jesus overturned the tables of the money changers, and the seats of those who were selling doves. Perhaps Jesus reacted stronger than He otherwise would have based on the extreme stress that He was under? In the end it doesn’t really matter, what is helpful is trying to get to know our Savior better so that we can better appreciate just how much He endured for our sins. It helps us to love Jesus even more.

Thank you for joining us today. Please join us again tomorrow as we look at Mark 12 and the greatest commandment. May God’s blessings be upon you until then. Amen

Comments

Dan W

Yes, His entry was "triumphal": He "despised the shame" as He endured the cross (Hebrews 12.2). He was the Victor!

Reply
Mustang

It is also "triumphal" because Jesus showed that he was Lord over everything, even death.

Reply
Mike

Don't get what "Triumphal Entry" is mean…

Reply
Michael
Mike

It was triumphal because Jesus was going to defeat sin and death and fulfill everything the prophets had foretold.

Reply
Dean Blevins
Mike

Michael, partially the "triumphal" entry really revolves around what people in Jerusalem at that time expected of the "Messiah" or anointed one, which is a term associated with King David in the Old Testament and amplified through Isaiah's vision in chapter 9 & 11. Most people in Jesus' day assumed the Messiah would be a kind of warrior king that would overthrow Roman rule and their celebration of Jesus was probably less about what we know post-resurrection than in their expectations of an earthly deliverer in the here and now. You might think of triumph much like triumph on the battlefield (think of all those movies of Cesar returning to Rome in a "triumphal procession." Mark's writing in the rest of the chapter pretty much highlights the contrast between who Jesus was and the failure of the people in Jerusalem to recognize the difference with their understanding. So the tension increases almost immediately in Mark's account in the curse of the fig tree in Bethany outside of Jerusalem as a kind of symbolic action of the failure of Israel to bear fruit (see Joel 2:21–25), then the confrontation with the money changers, and finally Jesus' authority under question. It does not take long for the lofty expectations of the people, in the kind of savior they want, clashes with Jesus' mission on the cross and through the empty tomb.

Reply
Michael
Dean Blevins

Great comments Brother. Thank you.

Reply